SABR

World War II era pitcher Nick Strincevich dies at 96

From SABR member Nick Diunte at Examiner.com on November 13, 2011:

While our country was celebrating the merits of our military veterans this Friday, the baseball family was mourning the loss of World War II era pitcher Nick Strincevich. He passed away November 11th in Valparaiso, Ind. At 96, he was the third oldest living major leaguer at the time of his death.

The first player to make the majors from Gary, Ind., his path started on the local sandlots. In 1934, “Jumbo” caught the attention of a local bird-dog scout in Indiana while playing semi-pro ball that led to him pitching batting practice for the New York Yankees in Chicago against the likes of Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. By the time he arrived home from his big day at the park, he received a telegram notifying him that he was now property of the Yankees.

Entering their organization in 1935, Strincevich advanced quickly through the Yankees minor league rank, closely following his manager Johnny Neun as they climbed their way to the major leagues. Strincevich was part of the dominant 1938 Newark Bears team that had almost exclusively a future major leaguer roster including Hall of Famer Joe Gordon. Despite his 11-4 record, the Yankees did not bring him up.

 

Read the full article here: http://www.examiner.com/baseball-history-in-national/world-war-ii-era-pitcher-strincevich-passes-away-on-veterans-day

This page was last updated November 14, 2011 at 10:45 am MST.

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