Instead of using shovels, Judge Roy Hofheinz and other officials fire six-shooters at the ceremonial groundbreaking of the Astrodome on January 3, 1962.

Movies, Bullfights, and Baseball, Too: Astrodome Built for Spectacle First and Sports Second

This article was written by Eric Robinson

This article was published in the The National Pastime: Baseball in the Space Age (Houston, 2014)


Instead of using shovels, Judge Roy Hofheinz and other officials fire six-shooters at the ceremonial groundbreaking of the Astrodome on January 3, 1962.

Instead of using shovels, Judge Roy Hofheinz and other officials fire six-shooters at the ceremonial ground-breaking. (PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE HOUSTON ASTROS)

 

“Houston Astrodome or Bust”
—Tagline for Bad News Bears in Breaking Training

 

 

A highlight was its 474-foot-long scoreboard, complete with a “seemingly endless repertoire of animated light pictures, story-board cartoons, or often simple one-word commands.” Here, the Astros congratulate Nolan Ryan on his 5th no-hitter in 1981.

A highlight of the Astrodome was its 474-foot-long scoreboard, complete with a “seemingly endless repertoire of animated light pictures, story-board cartoons, or often simple one-word commands.” Here, the Astros congratulate Nolan Ryan on his 5th no-hitter in 1981.

 

 

The Astrodome saw its share of stars over the years, including Biggio, who receives his 1989 Silver Slugger Award from manager Art Howe, left.

Houston Astros manager Art Howe, left, presents catcher Craig Biggio with his 1989 Silver Slugger award at the Astrodome.

 

ERIC ROBINSON, a graduate of the University of North Texas, currently works in elementary education in Austin. He focuses his research on pre-MLB baseball history, Texas baseball history, and Central Texas blackball history, on which he has presented to local schools. Eric recently discovered his grandmother had a neighbor who played for the 1933 Brooklyn Dodgers. His website is www.lyndonbaseballjohnson.com.

 

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