2019 SABR Black Sox Scandal Centennial Symposium speakers and schedule

We're excited to announce new speakers for the SABR Black Sox Scandal Centennial Symposium in Chicago.

The SABR Black Sox Scandal Research Committee will host this once-in-a-century event to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 1919 World Series from 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 28, 2019 at the Chicago History Museum. All baseball fans are welcome to attend; click here to register.

Check out the full symposium schedule below. Here are our featured speakers:

  • Bruce S. Allardice is a Professor of History at South Suburban College, near Chicago, and has authored numerous articles on the Black Sox, along with biographies of the Black Sox gamblers for the SABR BioProject. His article on “The Spread of Baseball in the South Prior to 1870” received the McFarland-SABR Baseball Research Award in 2013.
  • Kevin P. Braig is a partner with the law firm of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick, LLP, and a member of the International Masters of Gaming Law.
  • Dr. Susan Dellinger has been a loyal member of SABR since 2001. She has spoken at three national SABR conventions and local chapter meetings. Her book, Red Legs and Black Sox: Edd Roush and the Untold Story of the 1919 World Series, features the story of the 1919 World Series from the perspective of her grandfather, Cincinnati Reds star center fielder and Hall of Famer Edd Roush.
  • Michael Haupert is a Professor of Economics at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He has been a member of SABR since 1985 and is co-chair of the SABR Business of Baseball Committee and editor of its newsletter, Outside the Lines. He has published more than 60 articles on the business of baseball and his work on the the history of baseball salaries has been cited by numerous authors. He is a frequent presenter at SABR conferences and was the 2014 recipient of SABR's Doug Pappas Award for best oral presentation.
  • Rick Huhn is the author of three baseball books, including Eddie Collins: A Baseball Biography and, most recently, The Chalmers Race on the 1910 batting race between Ty Cobb and Nap Lajoie. He is a founding member and co-coordinator of the Hank Gowdy Columbus (Ohio) Chapter and a regular contributor to SABR publications. 
  • Bill Lamb is the author of Black Sox in the Courtroom: The Grand Jury, Criminal Trial and Civil Litigation and the 2019 recipient of the Bob Davids Award, SABR's highest honor. He is the editor of The Inside Game, the quarterly newsletter of SABR’s Deadball Era Committee, and a key contributor to SABR's Eight Myths Out project and Scandal on the South Side book. Prior to his retirement, he spent more than 30 years as a state/county prosecutor in New Jersey.
  • Daniel A. Nathan is a Professor of American Studies at Skidmore College. The author of the award-winning Saying It’s So: A Cultural History of the Black Sox Scandal (2003) and the editor of Rooting for the Home Team: Sport, Community, and Identity (2013) and Baltimore Sports: Stories from Charm City (2016), he has published essays and reviews for a variety of periodicals. Nathan is the Associate Editor for the Journal of Sport History, is on several editorial boards, and is Past President of the North American Society for Sport History.
  • David Pietrusza is the author of Rothstein: The Life, Times, and Murder of the Criminal Genius Who Fixed the 1919 World Series (2003), Judge and Jury: The Life and Times of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis (1998), and many other award-winning books. He has been called "the undisputed champion of chronicling American Presidential campaigns," and his critically acclaimed books include volumes on Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry Truman, Calvin Coolidge, and John F. Kennedy. He also collaborated with Baseball Hall of Famer Ted Williams on an autobiography, Ted Williams: My Life in Pictures; was editor-in-chief of the Total Baseball series; and he served as SABR's Board President from 1993 to 1997.
  • Jacob Pomrenke is SABR’s Director of Editorial Content and the editor of Scandal on the South Side: The 1919 Chicago White Sox. He has been a SABR member since 1998 and is the chairman and newsletter editor for the Black Sox Scandal Research Committee.
  • Bill Savage is Professor of Instruction in English at Northwestern University; he has been teaching the literature and history of the Big Fix and the Black Sox Scandal at Northwestern and the Newberry Library of Chicago in his baseball literature classes for over 20 years. He wrote an essay on the literary legacy of the 1919 White Sox for the SABR collection Go-Go to Glory: The 1959 Chicago White Sox, and he wrote about the 2016 Cubs season for ESPN.com. His doctoral dissertation, and other scholarship, has focused on one of the writers most responsible for mythologizing the Big Fix and the Black Sox Scandal, Chicago author Nelson Algren.

The Chicago History Museum is home to an extensive collection of Black Sox artifacts and documents, and we'll gather in the beautiful Morse Genius Chicago Room event space to discuss the continued relevance of the 1919 World Series and its aftermath. A book signing with SABR authors, including our own Scandal on the South Side: The 1919 Chicago White Sox, will follow.

For more information on the SABR Black Sox Scandal Centennial Symposium, or to register, click here.

 


SABR Black Sox Scandal Centennial Symposium schedule
Saturday, September 28, 2019
Chicago History Museum

  • 9:00-9:10 a.m.: Welcome and introduction
  • 9:10-10:10 a.m.: Say It Ain’t So: The Legacy of the Black Sox Scandal. Panelists: Daniel Nathan, David Pietrusza, Bill Savage. Moderator: Jacob Pomrenke.
  • 10:20-10:45 a.m.: Michael Haupert: "How Cheap was Charles Comiskey? Salaries and the Black Sox"
  • 10:55-11:20 a.m.: Dr. Susan Dellinger: "The 1919 Cincinnati Reds, Synthetic Champions?"
  • 11:25-11:50 a.m.: Kevin P. Braig: "Sports Gambling From 1919 to 2019"
  • 12:00-1:00 p.m.: Eight Myths Out: Shedding New Light on Baseball's Darkest Hour. Panelists: Bruce S. Allardice, Rick Huhn, Bill Lamb. Moderator: Jacob Pomrenke.

 

This page was last updated September 13, 2019 at 4:24 pm MST.